Gender pay reporting

This statement is submitted on behalf of Adecco UK Limited. It sets out the gender pay information for our employees which we are required to publish in accordance with the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.  

We supply recruitment services and are part of the Adecco group of companies (“The Adecco Group UK&I”).  The Adecco Group UK&I prides itself on being the leading workforce solutions partner and therefore takes fair and equal treatment of its own diverse workforce very seriously.  

According to the Office of National Statistics, the UK’s 2017 provisional figure for the mean gender pay gap is 17.4% and for the median gender pay gap is 18.4%. As of April 2018 all companies in the UK with 250 employees or more are required by law to publicly report their gender pay gap. This is an important regulation which The Adecco Group UK&I fully supports, as it strives to create a fairer and more equal workplace for all. The reporting requirement has been carried out nationwide, allowing companies to firstly identify their gender pay gap and secondly, pinpoint its cause so solutions can be created and implemented to close it.

It is important to distinguish the gender pay gap from equal pay. Equal pay issues arise where men are paid differently to women for the same work (or work of equal value).  In comparison the gender pay gap involves comparing the pay of men and women within an organisation irrespective of their position and the work they do


Analysis of our gender pay gap

Pay

Adecco Pay Gap

Bonus

The difference in mean bonus pay in the 12 months to April 2017 is -84.00% and the difference in median bonus pay is -67.00%. The proportion of men who received bonus pay in the relevant period is 4.69% and the proportion of women is 12.94%.

Pay Quartiles

Adecco Pay Quartiles

The data demonstrates a difference in mean pay of -7.78% and a difference of -3.17% in median pay, whilst the quartile pay bands are largely equal throughout the different job levels in the business.

The definition of “employee” for gender pay purposes includes a large number of our temporary workers. These are workers engaged by us but placed on assignment with our clients. We believe the inclusion of temporary workers in our gender pay report has impacted our figures given the following:

  • Although we ensure our temporary workers are paid fairly and in accordance with all legislation (including National Minimum Wage legislation and the Agency Workers Regulations 2010), we have limited influence over the pay of these workers as it depends on the rate specified by a particular client.  Without the ability to influence or change pay rates there is little scope to implement solutions. 
  • We supply workers to a range of clients across a number of different sectors.  These workers will be placed in a variety of roles so it is challenging to compare the data or identify any meaningful trends.

Given our commitment to this area we have undertaken further analysis of gender pay trends within our business particularly in respect of employees who work directly for Adecco UK Limited (e.g. our recruitment consultants).  These employees are referred to as “colleagues” internally. The results from our further analysis of our colleague population have indicated the following:

  • For the Adecco business the difference in median pay is minimal and far below the national average. 
  • The quartile pay bands provide an insight into an even pay structure
  • In terms of bonuses, the proportion of men and women who received bonuses is also very even

Our continued commitment to closing the gap

At The Adecco Group UK&I we encourage all our employees to succeed in their roles and teams. We pride ourselves on providing an environment and opportunities which allow everyone to thrive, regardless of their gender, ethnicity or background. 

The Adecco Group UK&I takes the gender pay data extremely seriously with a diversity and inclusion strategy as a key part of the talent agenda.  Therefore, The Adecco Group UK&I is working towards creating equality for pay by continuing to focus its efforts on career development, mentoring and talent initiatives. We are also proud to say that a high proportion of managerial roles are held by women and the proportion of women progressing up the organisation remains level.

The Group is constantly encouraging skill-set training to ensure an equal playing field. All employees are offered the same opportunities as we believe in providing all employees with equal learning and development opportunities. 

I confirm that the data published in this report is accurate


Alex Fleming